Teen Novels That Adults Will Love, Too

I have always been a big fan of adults reading teen content! Teen novels aren't all that different from what you'd find in the adult section, but one of the best parts is that they're usually a really engaging read! These books are designed so you wont want to put them down, and they're so good, adults should read them too!


If you'd like to find out more, or borrow any of these books, just click on the cover.


Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

With just a light touch of fantasy, a bit of "Now You See Me" thievery, and great character development, this book is a great adventure. Check out the new TV show based on the series on Netflix, "Shadow and Bone".


Ketterdam: a bustling hub of international trade where anything can be had for the right price--and no one knows that better than criminal prodigy Kaz Brekker. Kaz is offered a chance at a deadly heist that could make him rich beyond his wildest dreams. But he can't pull it off alone. . . .

A convict with a thirst for revenge.

A sharpshooter who can't walk away from a wager.

A runaway with a privileged past.

A spy known as the Wraith.

A Heartrender using her magic to survive the slums.

A thief with a gift for unlikely escapes.

Six dangerous outcasts. One impossible heist. Kaz's crew is the only thing that might stand between the world and destruction--if they don't kill each other first.

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo returns to the breathtaking world of the Grishaverse in this unforgettable tale about the opportunity--and the adventure--of a lifetime.



Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi (Book One)

This book isn't just about magic, but about fighting through oppression, self discovery, and general badassary.


They killed my mother.

They took our magic.

They tried to bury us.

Now we rise.

Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie's Reaper mother summoned forth souls.

But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope.

Now Zélie has one chance to bring back magic and strike against the monarchy. With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must outwit and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good.

Danger lurks in Orïsha, where snow leoponaires prowl and vengeful spirits wait in the waters. Yet the greatest danger may be Zélie herself as she struggles to control her powers and her growing feelings for an enemy.



On the Come Up by Angie Thomas

You probably heard of "The Hate U Give", and it really is as good as you've heard. This on is by the same author, and promises the same relatable, dramatic insight into an experience different than your own.

Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least win her first battle. As the daughter of an underground hip hop legend who died right before he hit big, Bri's got massive shoes to fill.

But it's hard to get your come up when you're labeled a hoodlum at school, and your fridge at home is empty after your mom loses her job. So Bri pours her anger and frustration into her first song, which goes viral . . . for all the wrong reasons.

Bri soon finds herself at the center of a controversy, portrayed by the media as more menace than MC. But with an eviction notice staring her family down, Bri doesn't just want to make it--she has to. Even if it means becoming the very thing the public has made her out to be.

Insightful, unflinching, and full of heart, On the Come Up is an ode to hip hop from one of the most influential literary voices of a generation. It is the story of fighting for your dreams, even as the odds are stacked against you; and about how, especially for young black people, freedom of speech isn't always free.


The Hive by Barry Lyga

I am always a fan of near-future dystopias, and this one hits close to home with a fascinating sci-fi vibe.

It's the near future--the day after tomorrow--and the government has shut down online bullying once and for all. With BLINQ, its new social media platform, users can "like" or "share," but they can also "condemn" posts--and if condemns reach a certain level, users can exact punishment from the original poster in real life. No more anonymous trolling! Instead... hive justice. Seventeen-year-old Cassie McKinney is angry at everything. She's just lost her beloved father, a cult hero in the hacking world. She's been uprooted to a new apartment and--worse--a new school. Cassie is barely enduring senior year when she's drawn into a powerful group of girls and their effort to make their posts go viral. Cassie's just trying to be funny when she posts a cutting BLINQ. But when that BLINQ goes viral in all the worst ways, she becomes the target of a furious mob. Abandoned by her friends, betrayed by the system, and bristling at the injustice of it all, Cassie goes on the run. In the shadows, she finds people to help her hide. If she wants to clear her name, though, she will have to work with them to unravel a conspiracy beyond her imagination.



The Bone Houses by Emily Lloyd-Jones


Just the right amount of spooky and fantastical!


Seventeen-year-old Aderyn ("Ryn") only cares about two things: her family and her family's graveyard. And right now, both are in dire straits. Since the death of their parents, Ryn and her siblings have been scraping together a meager existence as gravediggers in the remote village of Colbren, which sits at the foot of a harsh and deadly mountain range that was once home to the fae. The problem with being a gravedigger in Colbren, though, is that the dead don't always stay dead.

The risen corpses are known as "bone houses," and legend says that they're the result of a decades-old curse. When Ellis, an apprentice mapmaker with a mysterious past, arrives in town, the bone houses attack with new ferocity. What is it that draws them near? And more importantly, how can they be stopped for good?

Together, Ellis and Ryn embark on a journey that will take them into the heart of the mountains, where they will have to face both the curse and the deeply-buried truths about themselves. Equal parts classic horror novel and original fairy tale, The Bone Houses will have you spellbound from the very first page.



Turtles All the Way Down by John Green


If you have anxiety, this book makes you feel a little less alone. If you don't have anxiety, this book is a beautiful and lovely look into what it can be like to have anxiety.


Sixteen-year-old Aza never intended to pursue the mystery of fugitive billionaire Russell Pickett, but there's a hundred thousand dollar reward at stake and her Best and Most Fearless Friend, Daisy, is eager to investigate. So together, they navigate the short distance and broad divides that separate them from Russell Pickett's son, Davis. Aza is trying. She is trying to be a good daughter, a good friend, a good student, and maybe even a good detective, while also living within the ever-tightening spiral of her own thoughts.



Full Disclosure by Camryn Garrett

A realistic look at what life and relationships are like with STIs, and even more jarring to think of the teenagers who may be struggling with this.


Simone Garcia-Hampton is starting over at a new school, and this time things will be different. She's making real friends, making a name for herself as student director of Rent, and making a play for Miles, the guy who makes her melt every time he walks into a room. The last thing she wants is for word to get out that she's HIV-positive, because last time . . . well, last time things got ugly.

Keeping her viral load under control is easy, but keeping her diagnosis under wraps is not so simple. As Simone and Miles start going out for real--shy kisses escalating into much more--she feels an uneasiness that goes beyond butterflies. She knows she has to tell him that she's positive, especially if sex is a possibility, but she's terrified of how he'll react! And then she finds an anonymous note in her locker: I know you have HIV. You have until Thanksgiving to stop hanging out with Miles. Or everyone else will know too.

Simone's first instinct is to protect her secret at all costs, but as she gains a deeper understanding of the prejudice and fear in her community, she begins to wonder if the only way to rise above is to face the haters head-on. . . .


For more collections of book recommendations, check them out here.

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